Distinctively shaped towers characterize Hovenweep's 1200 A.D. architecture          

ARCHAEOLOGY
& CULTURE

Hovenweep National Monument

Hovenweep, a Ute Indian word meaning "deserted valley," was established as a National Monument on March 2, 1923. Hovenweep is located on the Colorado/Utah border, just an hour west of Cortez.

The Square Tower site serves as headquarters for visiting the six Ancestral Puebloan sites located within the monument. These sites were erected around 1200 A.D. in the Hovenweep canyons, and are characterized by their unique square, oval, circular, and D-shaped towers.

The Square Tower Site is easily accessible, reaching the other sites requires driving along bumpy roads and some hiking. Hovenweep is an ideal destination for visitors looking for a peaceful walk through pinon and juniper en route to remote archaeological sites.



Hovenweep National Monument features six Ancestral Puebloan sites (including Square Tower Group, shown here) erected around 1200 AD. The architecture at Hovenweep is well known for its square, oval, circular and D-shaped towers.
Hovenweep National Monument features six Ancestral Puebloan sites (including Square Tower Group, shown here) erected around 1200 AD. The architecture at Hovenweep is well known for its square, oval, circular and D-shaped towers.